Chrome now using more ram due to the Meltdown and Spectre bugs.

“Site Isolation does cause Chrome to create more renderer processes, which comes with performance tradeoffs,” Google’s Charlie Reis says. “On the plus side, each renderer process is smaller, shorter-lived, and has less contention internally, but there is about a 10-13% total memory overhead in real workloads due to the larger number of processes. Our team continues to work hard to optimize this behavior to keep Chrome both fast and secure.”

It’s a significant performance hit, especially for a browser battling a reputation for being a memory hog, but a worthwhile one nonetheless. Spectre lets attackers access protected information in your PC’s kernel memory, potentially revealing sensitive details like passwords, cryptographic keys, personal photos, or anything else you’ve used on your computer. It’s bad.

thinkstockphotos 499123970 laptop security

Site Isolation guards against Spectre and has been available as an experimental option since Chrome 63, which released around the time of the Meltdown and Spectre disclosures, but it’s now enabled by default for 99 percent of Chrome users on all platforms.

“Site Isolation is a large change to Chrome’s architecture that limits each renderer process to documents from a single site,” Reis says. “…This means that even if a Spectre attack were to occur in a malicious webpage, data from other websites would generally not be loaded into the same process, and so there would be much less data available to the attacker. This significantly reduces the threat posed by Spectre.”

Google promises further mitigations and memory optimizations in future Chrome updates.

If you PC or laptop is running low on memory then you may want to add more ram. You can find out what RAM you need by clicking on our Memory Finder 

We also sell RAM on our website and at the store

If you need extra protection for your machine, we recommend using Malwarebytes Premium Edition which we sell for $34.99 for a lifetime license.

Article on PC World